Dream Season: Wade Boggs

Every player longs for that dream season. The one where they stay healthy and just produce. I’m going to crunch the numbers and create dream seasons for notable 1980s stars. This time I’ll take a look at Wade Boggs.

March/April 1983

Boggs hit a cool .349 as a rookie in 1982 and didn’t miss a beat heading into his second season. In 19 games, Wade recorded two or more hits ten times, including four different three-hit games. He also drew twelve walks to finish the month with a .378 batting average and a .471 on-base percentage.  He finished the season with a .361 batting average.

May 1986

Nineteen-Eighty-Six was Wade Boggs’ fifth season in the big leagues. It was also the year he won his 3rd batting title. When you hit .357 you’re going to have some big months and May of 1986 certainly was for Boggs.

In 27 games, Boggs hit .471 with three homers and 20 RBI. He also drew 24 walks for an on-base percentage of .567. Included in the month was a 5-6 performance against the Minnesota Twins on May 20th, the first five-hit game of his career. But like any pure hitter, Wade was looking for more.

“I was thinking about six,” Boggs told the Boston Globe. “But I’d never gone 5 for 5, so I didn’t really think much about going 6 for 6. The last time I did 5 for 5 was in high school.”

June 1987

Wade BoggsBy 1987, Boggs had fully established himself as one of the game’s top hitters. He’d won three straight batting titles and four overall. He was on his way to a 5th. In June of that month, Wade hit a cool .485 with an on-base percentage of .581. Boggs played in 26 games in June of 1987 and had at least one hit in 25 of them, including 15 games of two or more hits.

“I just swing, make contact and hope it falls in,” he said. It’s just that easy.

July 1983

Boggs began July of 1983 in a horrible slump. He went 0-4 against the Yankees on July 1st. After that, it was pretty much business as usual. He went 11-17 in a four-game series against the Oakland A’s and finished the month hitting .404.

August 1985

Wade BoggsAnother month, another 49 hits for Wade Boggs. Such was the case in August of 1985. Boggs went 49-123 in the month, good for a somewhat mortal .398 batting average.

In a one-week span, from August 8th through the 14th, Wade hit .485 against the White Sox, Yankees and Royals.

“A lot of luck,” Boggs said. “If the luck keeps up, I’m probably going to hit for a high average. Once I see a pitcher, I know exactly what he throws. And that’s not going to change. Whatever he throws, you know you’re going to see it again.”

It’a good to be lucky.

September/October 1988

A strong season requires a strong finish and Wade didn’t disappoint as he hit .423 to wrap up the 1988 season, one in which he led either the American League or the Major Leagues in plate appearances, doubles, runs scored, walks, intentional walks, batting average, on-base percentage and OPS. It’s all part of the challenge of playing the game.

“Once you get out there, it’s one on one,” he told the Boston Globe. “There’s no guy to set a pick for you. No guy to throw a block for you. No guy to shoot the puck over to you. When you get a hit, you’ve won. And the team wins, because you’ve contributed to a winning effort.

“It’s the same way with a pitcher. Why is he trying to get everybody out? To improve his record. But if he does, the team benefits.”

The Totals:

 

Teams benefitted from having Wade Boggs at 3rd base and his dream season comes to an end with some impressive numbers. Added up, it comes to 257 hits in 601 at-bats, good for a .428 batting average with 114 walks thrown in, giving him a tidy .516 on-base percentage.

Dream Season: George Brett

Every player longs for that dream season. The one where they stay healthy and just produce. I’m going to crunch the numbers and create dream seasons for notable 1980s stars. Next up is George Brett.

March/April 1983

There are quick starts and then there’s the jump George Brett got on the 1983 season. In the first week of the year, Brett hit .440 with a homer and 4 RBI. Then he got hot. He finished April with a .460 batting average, 5 homers and 20 RBI.

May 1979

Compared to April of ’83, Brett’s 1979 May was somewhat pedestrian. For a mortal, though, it was still a helluva month. How about sixteen multi-hit games, including a 5-7 effort against the Orioles on May 28th? Imagine posting 16 multi-hit games in a month and it not being the best month of your career. In May of 1979, Brett hit .388 with 5 homers and 20 RBI.

June 1982

In June of 1982, George Brett played in 27 games. He had at least one hit in 23 of them. He entered the month hitting .278 and finished the month hitting .317. It’s not easy to raise your batting average 39 points in mid-season but for George Brett, it’s no big deal. For the month, he hit .379 with 5 homers and 16 RBI.

July 1985

One of the things that are tougher than raising your batting average by 39 points in June is raising it by 31 points in July. That’s exactly what George Brett did in July of 1985, thanks in part to six different 3-hit games. Brett opened the month by going 8-12 with 2 homers and 8 RBI in a three-game series against Oakland and finished the month going 4-9 against Detroit. The final numbers? A cool .432 batting average with 7 homers and 24 RBI.

August 1980

Brett had his best season in 1980, batting .390 and winning the MVP. On August 17th at home against the Blue Jays, he wrapped up a three-game series by going 4-4 to raise his batting average to .401. He would flirt with the .400 mark for a month before fading at the end of the year but for that month he was on fire, hitting .430 with 6 homers and 30 RBI.

September/October 1981

It’s important to have a strong finish to your season and Brett certainly did that in 1981. Fourteen multi-hit games, five three-hit games and a .362 batting average with 3 homers and 20 RBI is a nice way to wrap up your year.

The Totals:

Add it all up and the totals for George Brett’s dream season look pretty good. He ends up hitting .404 with 31 homers and 130 RBI.

One of the most amazing things I saw when putting this together was the months that DIDN’T make the cut. Over the course of his career, George Brett had 17 different months in which he hit .350 or better.

I also intentionally used only one month from 1980 just to mix things up a bit. If you use his June, July & August numbers from 1980, Brett’s dream season batting average jumps to .423.

Dream Season: Mike Schmidt

Every player longs for that dream season. The one where they stay healthy and just produce. I’m going to crunch the numbers and create dream seasons for notable 1980s stars. We’ll start with Mike Schmidt.

April 1986

Schmitty had some slow starts, but his final season was not among them. He went 2-4 with a homer off Mario Soto on Opening Day and kept going. Not a huge power month, but the batting average was solid. He ended April hitting .328 with 5 homers and 19 RBI with 10 runs scored. A great way to kick off the season.

May 1980

The Phillies first World Series season was Mike Schmidt‘s finest season as well and May was a huge month. Philadelphia entered May already 4.5 games behind in the National League East but by the end of the month, they were back in it. Schmidt hit .305 with 12 homers and 29 RBI to earn Player of the Month honors. His teammate Steve Carlton also had a pretty good month, going 6-1 with a 1.88 E.R.A. and was named Pitcher of the Month.

June 1977

After leading the National League in home runs for three consecutive seasons, Schmidt finished 4th in 1977, but he still hit 38 dingers and drove in 101 runs. He also raised his batting average and cut down on his strikeouts. In June, Schmitty hit .318 with 14 homers and 28 RBI.   His biggest day came on June 10th against Atlanta when he went 3-4 with two homers and 5 RBI, one of two multi-homer games that month.

July 1979

Once Pete Rose came to the Phillies, Schmidt’s career really took off. He hit 40 homers for the first time in 1979 and his July was something to remember. Mike hit .354 with 13 homers and drove in 32 runs in 28 games. During a four-game series against the San Francisco Giants from July 6-9 at The Vet, Schmidt went 8-14 with 6 homers and 13 RBI. The Giants never knew what hit ’em.

August 1981

Among the many tragedies of the strike season was what it took away from Mike Schmidt. He won his second consecutive MVP award that season and also had the best single-season batting average of his career, batting .316. When the players finally got back on the field Schmitty went off, hitting .380 with 9 homers and 24 RBI in 20 games.

September/October 1980

The stretch run in 1980 is something no Phillies phan will ever forget and Mike Schmidt played a huge role. For the month, he hit .298 with 13 homers and 28 RBI, but there’s one homer that stands out above the rest. On the next to last day of the season, his 11th inning homer in Montreal gave the Phillies the N.L. East division crown.

The Totals:

When you put it all together, it doesn’t look too bad. In Mike Schmidt’s dream season he hit .327 with 66 homers and 160 RBI while scoring 118 runs. I’ll take that.